Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities encompass a wide range of cultures and lived experiences, and each one is an important part of the American narrative. Their stories are American stories, and their voices deserve to be heard. That’s why we’re highlighting a few of the stories from our AAPI participants, to help people find connection and understanding by amplifying their words.

Whose voices do you want to see included in the narratives of Asian American and Pacific Islander history? By sitting down with someone you love for a StoryCorps conversation, you’re showing them that their stories matter and preserving them for generations.

StoryCorps Connect makes it possible to interview a loved one remotely and then upload it to the StoryCorps archive at the Library of Congress.


No More Questions!

Strong-willed Kay Wang allowed her son and granddaughter to ask her a few brief questions about her adventures in life — from disobeying her mother and rebuffing suitors while growing up in China to late-life escapades as a detective for Bloomingdale’s.


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“When I buy a new book, I don’t start reading the first page. I smell it.”
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A Love Story in 10,000 Books

Alagappa Rammohan has amassed enough books over the course of his life to fill a small library. He shares his love of the written word with his daughter, Paru Venkat, and his plans to donate all of his books to his hometown in India.


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"It was not so much of hugging or saying I love you. But it was all the things she did."
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Lola’s Work

Kenneth Tan celebrates the life of grandmother, Crescenciana Tan, whom he called Lola. He remembers Lola’s hard work and unwavering commitment to her family. 


Driving Lessons

Muhammad Faridi talks to his father about what it was like to grow up as the son of a NYC cab driver. Although he used to be embarrassed to talk about his family, Muhammad learned to be proud of his father’s work.


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“If I’m in front of a blank sheet of paper with a pencil, I find such solace.”
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From Internment to Disney

Willie Ito dreamed of becoming an animator, but his dreams were put on hold when his family was sent to a Japanese American internment camp. At StoryCorps, Willie reflects on his internment and his career as an animator at Disney


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“I decided to adopt that magpie, which I called Maggie.”
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The “Heart” of Heart Mountain

When he was 10 years old, Shig Yabu and his family were evacuated from their home and relocated to an internment camp. He remembers what defined his experience as an internee — adopting and caring for a bird named Maggie.


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“We had even stronger bonds because we had survived this together.”
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Reunited after 50 years: Friends from the Vietnam War

Kay Lee and John Nordeen became fast friends while serving together in the same Army platoon in Vietnam. After losing touch, they reconnected to reflect on the early days of their friendship.


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“Because she was Asian, they wouldn’t accept her. Mom said she didn’t care; she enlisted anyway.”
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Remembering One Tough Veteran: Lieutenant Susan Ahn Cuddy

Susan Ahn Cuddy was the first Asian American woman in the Navy and the first woman gunnery officer teaching air combat tactics. Her children, Flip and Christine, remember her as a tough, yet loving mother.